March 7, 2018 – David J. Roxburgh

Department Chair
Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Professor of Islamic Art History, Harvard University

“Painting After the Mass-Produced Image: Art in 19th-Century Iran”

Rulers of the Qajar dynasty (1779-1925) in Iran pursued a broad range of military, bureaucratic and social reforms, formed new institutions—including the first polytechnic (Dar al-Funun, “Abode of the Sciences”), and embraced new technologies of the mass-produced image (photography and lithography). It was also a period of heightened exchange between Iran, India, Russia and the countries of Europe, in which greater numbers of people traveled between these regions for work, trade, diplomacy, education, and tourism. Art produced under Qajar rule—for elite and middle class audiences—fully reflected this new mixture of mediums and images moved across and between them with great fluidity. While Persian artists welcomed these new mediums—freely excerpting subjects from a broad range of high through popular visual culture and combining them to produce innovative artworks—the majority of European visitors by contrast offered scathing and derisive criticism. The largely negative history of reception of Qajar art has haunted art historical scholarship until recent years. The lecture examines the processes by which Qajar artists—whether working at the royal court or in the bazaar—embraced new technologies of the image and examines the nature of their resulting intermedial artworks. What were the implications for the art of painting after the advent of photography and lithography?

March 21, 2018 – Jason Sun

Brooke Russell Astor Curator of Chinese Art
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

“The First Emperor, the Chinese Empire, and the Wider World: Art and Material Culture of the Qin Dynasty”

By examining the art and material culture recovered through archaeology in the last fifty years, this presentation focuses on the First Emperor of China and the Empire that he created during the late third century B.C. It also explores the contact between China and other parts of the world, which resulted from the increased trade and exchange over the transcontinental Silk Road and through maritime routes across the oceans.

 

March 28, 2018 – Min Kyung Lee

Assistant Professor, Growth and Structure of Cities

“Mapping Paris under Haussmann”

Late eighteenth-century France witnessed a significant shift in the composition and value of maps as projective and scientific instruments, and they gained new importance in governance and planning. This talk will discuss the surveys that were conducted and maps that were drawn during the modernization of Paris. Under consideration will be the ways in which the correspondence between a map and city is established and the complications involved in using them for urban constructions.

April 4, 2018 – Nicholas R. Jones

Assistant Professor of Spanish and Africana Studies, Bucknell University

“Black Skin Acts: Feasting on Blackness, Staging Linguistic Blackface”

This talk argues that early-modern Africanized Castilian–commonly referred to as habla de negros–cannot be separated from the act and practice of blackface performance. What I hope to make clear in this lecture is that black skin acts in conjunction with the excessively deformed black corporeality of the bozal’s black mouth as well as the register of the sonic highlighted by “African” dances, lyrics, and songs. My theory of feasting (on Blackness), as a racially performative act, fortifies the success of blackface’s convincing entertainment to the audience enjoying its blackface performance.

April 11, 2018 – John J. Curley

Associate Professor of Art History, Department of Art, Wake Forest University

“Reframing High Modernist Painting: The Case of Morris Louis”

The paintings of Morris Louis are hallmarks of a hermetic American modernism that seem far removed from the political and social concerns of the 1960s.  In this talk, Prof. Curley will use Louis’s painting as a means to explore the ways that art and science had become uncanny doppelgangers by the early part of the decade.  When considered as expressions of a technocratic turn in American culture, Louis’s works can be situated alongside those by Andy Warhol and other artists interested in machines.

April 25, 2018 – Jason Sun (re-scheduled from March 21)

Brooke Russell Astor Curator of Chinese Art
The Metropolitan Museum of Art

“The First Emperor, the Chinese Empire, and the Wider World: Art and Material Culture of the Qin Dynasty”

By examining the art and material culture recovered through archaeology in the last fifty years, this presentation focuses on the First Emperor of China and the Empire that he created during the late third century B.C. It also explores the contact between China and other parts of the world, which resulted from the increased trade and exchange over the transcontinental Silk Road and through maritime routes across the oceans.

September 13, 2017- Richard Torchia

Director, Arcadia University Art Gallery
Reconsidering the Exhibition as Medium”

The re-staging of Harald Szeemann’s “Live in Your Head: When Attitudes Become Form,” for the 2013 Venice Biennale served as a dramatic reminder of how gallery display impacts our experience of art. Originally presented at the Bern Kunsthalle in 1969, its recent reconstruction (curated by Germano Celant, in dialogue with Thomas Demand and RemKoolhaas), foregrounded the ways in which our sensitivities to the staging of artworks has changed over time. The project also confirmed that the matrix of conditions that constitute exhibition making offer singular possibilities and restrictions that become more critical as new platforms of presentation emerge. Using examples of other re-stagings and a sampling of recent solo and group shows, this talk will explore the evolution of the exhibition as a medium and its impact on artmaking, curatorial practice, and questions of authorship and interpretation.

 

September 20, 2017 – Jordi Falgàs

Director, Fundació Rafael Masó, Girona (Spain)
Lecturer in Catalan Studies, Stanford University
“A Different Grand Tour: Postcards from a Honeymoon”

In 1912 the Catalan architect Rafael Masó (1880-1935) took a seven-week honeymoon trip to France, Switzerland, Germany, and Italy. Scholars have noted how crucial this trip was as it provided him with first-hand exposure to Secession and Regionalist architecture and design. Throughout the trip he purchased seventy postcards, but so far nobody has paid attention to the visual content of these documents. What did such iconographic choice mean, and what does it tell us? The lecture will focus primarily on Masó’s stay in Germany (including the Darmstadt’s Artist Colony, the Hellerau Garden City, and Munich), and will consider not only the written content but also the visual significance of the postcards he acquired, something not discussed in the existing literature. A closer analysis of the architect’s choice of itinerary, words, and pictures will provide us with a deeper understanding of his particular Grand Tour.

September 27, 2017 – Jo Anna Isaak

John L. Marion Chair in Art History, Fordham University
Women Artists and the Arte Útil Movement”

“We have to put Duchamp’s urinal back in the restroom,” announced Cuban artist Tania Bruguera. Bruguera is the founder of Arte Útil movement. She is one of a rapidly growing number of artists who no longer make works of art but are instead engaged in making art work. Rather than making things—art objects that enter the commodity system—they have been turning their creative energies to changing things: finding ways to give art agency and formulating strategies for some of the most progressive practices of contemporary art. They have taken up the very radical idea that art can be useful. Not surprisingly, it is women artists who are among the most active in this movement—making art that has relocated from the galleries and museums, migrated from behind the couch, and gone out to work.

 

September 28, 2017 – “Beyond Boundaries: Feminine Forms”

Beyond Boundaries: Feminine Forms

Bryn Mawr College (BMC):
September 28, 2017 – January 28, 2018
Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA):
September 15, 2017 – March 18, 2018


Please join us for the exhibition and related programming for Beyond Boundaries: Feminine Forms, a dual-sited exhibition of artworks from The William and Uytendale Scott Memorial Study Collection of Works by Women Artists at Bryn Mawr College and the Linda Lee Alter Collection of Art by Women at Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. The collaboration, conceived by graduate students in the History of Art, Mechella Yezernitskaya and Laurel McLaughlin, in collaboration with Carrie Robbins, Curator for Art & Artifacts, BMC, and Jodi Throckmorton, Curator of Contemporary Art, PAFA, brings together two institutions, collections, and curatorial teams for an exhibition that highlights and reexamines each institution’s inclusive efforts to collect artworks by women.

Opening Receptions:
PAFA: Friday, September 15, 5 – 7:30pm
BMC: Thursday, September 28, 4:30 – 6pm
Colloquium Lecture:
Jo Anna Isaak, John L. Marion Chair in Art History, Fordham University
Wednesday, September 27, 12:30 – 2pm, College Hall 224, BMC
Sponsored by the Center for Visual Culture 
Curatorial Conversation:
Jo Anna Isaak, John L. Marion Chair in Art History, Fordham University
Thursday, September 28, 12 – 1pm, Class of 1912 Rare Book Room, BMC

Conservation Lecture:
Corine McHugh, paper conservator
Friday, October 6, 12 – 1pm, Class of 1912 Rare Book Room, BMC
Sponsored by Special Collections
Artist Panel for PAFA’s Points of View series:
Judith Brodsky and Eileen Neff in conversation with curators
Saturday, October 7, 2 – 3:30pm, Auditorium, Historic Landmark Building, PAFA
Collector’s Conversation:
Linda Lee Alter, Artist, Collector, and Philanthropist
Thursday, October 13, 12 – 1pm, Class of 1912 Rare Book Room, BMC
Curators’ Conversation for PAFA’s Art at Lunch series:
Mechella Yezernitzkaya and Laurel McLaughlin discuss collecting histories and museological frameworks
Wednesday, October, 25, 12 – 1pm, Auditorium, Historic Landmark Building, PAFA

Museum Studies Lecture: Black Feminist Visuality
Dr. Kelli Morgan, The Winston & Carolyn Lowe Curatorial Fellow for Diversity in the Fine Arts, PAFA
Friday, October 27, 12 – 1pm, Class of 1912 Rare Book Room, BMC
Sponsored by Museum Studies

Conversation with multimedia artist Katie Hubbell:
Graduate students Matthew Jameson (PhD candidate, Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology), Mechella Yezernitskaya (PhD candidate, History of Art), and Kat Ford (MA candidate, History of Art), and Mechella Yezernitskaya join Katie Hubbell in conversation about her commissioned work for Fragmentary Excess: Body, Text, Receptacle (on view in the Eva Jan Coombe Suite) and her take on Beyond Boundaries: Feminine Forms
Friday, November 3, 12 – 1pm, Seminar Room 205, 2nd Floor Canaday Library, BMC

Artist Lecture:
Neila Kun, Artist
Friday, November 10, 12 -1pm, Class of 1912 Rare Book Room, BMC
Co-sponsored by the Art Club and Special Collections
Art-making Workshop:
Neila Kun, Artist
Saturday, November 11, 11am – 4pm, Arnecliffe Studio, BMC
Registration required (consult website)
Co-sponsored by the Art Club and Special Collections
Open Space Conversation:
Ruth Fine, Artist and former Curator, National Gallery of Art
Wednesday, November 15, 12 – 1pm, Class of 1912 Rare Book Room, BMC
Co-sponsored by the Dean’s Office and Museum Studies

Undergraduate Curatorial Workshop:
Label-writing, brainstorming, and curatorial planning with curators
Friday, November 17, 12 – 1pm, Class of 1912 Rare Book Room, BMC
Museum Studies Tour
Tessa Haas (Class of 2018), Museum Studies Fieldwork Intern
Friday, December 1, 12 – 1pm, Class of 1912 Rare Book Room, BMC

Artist’s Lecture:
Lesley Dill, 2017 Fellow of The John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation
Friday, December 8, 6:30 – 8pm, College Great Hall, BMC
Co-sponsored by the departments of History of Art, History, English, and LITS; the programs in Comparative Literature, Dance, Gender and Sexuality Studies, 360 Course Clusters, and Museum Studies; The Center for Visual Culture at Bryn Mawr College, and the Visual Studies program and The Hurford Center for the Arts and Humanities at Haverford College

Collector’s Tour:
Bill Scott, Artist, Collector, and Instructor at PAFA
Wednesday, January 24, 4:30 – 5:30pm, Class of 1912 Rare Book Room, BMC

For more information please visit:

https://www.pafa.org/exhibitions/beyond-boundaries-feminine-forms
http://www.brynmawr.edu/library/exhibits/BeyondBoundaries.html

Image: Mary Nomecos (b. 1943), Swan, 1991. Oil, graphite, pastel, and collage on paper, 11 x 17 1/2 in. Bryn Mawr College,
The William and Uytendale Scott Memorial Study Collection of Works by Women Artists, Gift of Bill Scott, 2006.1.146. ©Mary Nomecos