October 26, 2022 – Paul Farber

Paul M. Farber, PhD
Director and Co-Founder, Monument Lab
Senior Research Scholar, Center for Public Art and Space, University of Pennsylvania

“Monument Lab: On Civic Practice and Possibility”

We encourage everyone who is on campus to join us for this in-person talk in Old Library 224. If you are not able to join us in person, please register for the Zoom link at https://visualculture.blogs.brynmawr.edu/

November 2, 2022 – Linda Kim

Linda Kim
Associate Professor of American and Modern Art, Drexel University

“Reciprocal Models: Imperial and Racial Formations at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair”

We encourage everyone who is on campus to join us for this in-person talk in Old Library 224. If you are not able to join us in person, please register for the Zoom link at https://visualculture.blogs.brynmawr.edu/

 

November 9, 2022 – Dr. Mia L. Bagneris via Zoom

Dr. Mia L. Bagneris
Associate Professor, Art History & Africana Studies
Director, Africana Studies Program
Tulane University, New Orleans, LA (Bulbancha)

Imagining the Oriental South: The Enslaved Mixed-Race Beauty in British Art and Visual Culture, c. 1865-1880
 
Using works like John Bell’s Octoroon (1868) and Robert Gavin’s Quadroon Girl (ca. 1872) as case studies, this talk explores Britons’ pronounced and continued fascination with the figure of the enslaved American mixed-race beauty—even and especially after the abolition of slavery in the United States rendered the potential of such figures as tools for abolitionist suasion obsolete.  I analyze marked visual and rhetorical echoes between representations of the so-called “tragic” mulatto, quadroon, or octoroon and concurrent expressions of Orientalism.  Ultimately, I argue that, against the upright image of Victorian England, the American South—and especially Catholic Louisiana—could be imagined as a place of luxury, debauchery, and desire, a perfect echo to the “Orient” in the British popular imagination and one made stronger by the perceived association of both regions with the traffic in pretty women as “sex slaves”.
This online event will be offered via Zoom. To register, please go to https://visualculture.blogs.brynmawr.edu/

November 16 – Anthony S. Foy

Anthony S. Foy
Associate Professor of English Literature
Swarthmore College

“Racial Publicity and the Self Unseen: Black Autobiography after the Halftone”

We encourage everyone who is on campus to join us for this in-person talk in Old Library 224. If you are not able to join us in person, please register for the Zoom link at https://visualculture.blogs.brynmawr.edu/

November 30, 2022 – Sonal Khullar

Sonal Khullar
W. Norman Brown Associate Professor of South Asian Studies
Department of History of Art
University of Pennsylvania

“Decolonizing the Field: Art, Event, and Environment in India.”

We encourage everyone who is on campus to join us for this in-person talk in Old Library 224. If you are not able to join us in person, please register for the Zoom link at https://visualculture.blogs.brynmawr.edu/

February 9, 2022 – Ana Lucia Araujo

Professor of History, Howard University
“Exhibiting Slavery: A Visual History of Slave Collars”

Several permanent and temporary exhibitions in Europe and the Americas have attempted to represent slavery by featuring physical punishment. To achieve this goal most exhibitions display instruments of torture such as chains, shackles, and collars. To understand the broad implications of these representations of violence, this lecture attempts to build a visual history of slave collars. First, I retrace the use of lave collars to Antiquity. Second, I use engravings and paintings dating between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries to show how the representation of slave collars was widespread in European art during this period, therefore confirming the visible presence of enslaved people in Europe. Third, I connect these representations to similar devices today housed in museum collections in the Netherlands, Portugal, England, Brazil, and the United States. Finally, I discuss the broad implications of displaying this kind of torture device in museum exhibitions today.

Please register here.