September 17, 2014 – David Cast, Professor, Department of History of Art, Bryn Mawr College

Professor of History of Art and the Eugenia Chase Guild Chair in the Humanities
Department of History of Art, Bryn Mawr College

Title TBA

August 11 2014 | Events and Grad Group Events and News and Weekly Colloquia | No Comments »

September 24, 2014 – Susan S. Levine, LCSW, BCD

Private practice of Psychoanalysis, Psychotherapy and Clinical Supervision, Ardmore, PAFaculty, Institute of the Psychoanalytic Center of PhiladelphiaFaculty, Center for Psychoanalysis, Department of Psychiatry, Albert Einstein Medical Center

“Means and Ends in Hitchcock’s Vertigo, or Kant You See?”

This paper offers an original reading of Hitchcock’s Vertigo. Using the Kantian categorical imperative, also known as the principle of dignity, the plot is interpreted from the viewpoint of means and ends.  This theme of dignity and dignity violations is juxtaposed with discoveries about the choices of the names “Madeleine” and “Judy” and the two ends of the film.  The significance of the names is explored in relation to the novel on which the film was based and to a recently uncovered interest of Hitchcock.   Through a psychoanalyst’s attention to language and images, this essay explores means and ends from philosophical, psychological, and artistic perspectives.

August 10 2014 | Events and Grad Group Events and News and Weekly Colloquia | No Comments »

October 1, 2014 – Rosi Song

Chair and Associate Professor of Spanish, Department of Spanish, Bryn Mawr College

Title TBA

August 09 2014 | Events and Grad Group Events and News and Weekly Colloquia | No Comments »

October 8, 2014 – Benjamin Tiven

Artist, Tyler School of Art, Temple University

For more information about Benjamin Tiven-

TItle TBA

August 08 2014 | News | No Comments »

October 15, 2014 – No Colloquium

Fall Break

August 06 2014 | Events and Grad Group Events and News and Weekly Colloquia | No Comments »

October 22, 2014 – Elizabeth S. Bolman

Professor, Department of Art History
Tyler School of Art, Temple University

“The Red Monastery Church: Beauty and Asceticism in Upper Egypt”

The results of a ten year conservation project at the Red Monastery church have revealed a fabulously dynamic, painted interior with close aesthetic and iconographic ties to major early Byzantine monuments. The church dates to the late fifth century, a formative period in the history of monasticism. It illustrates one of the earliest conjunctions of spectacular monumental architecture and asceticism, a fusion that has become so familiar that it seems natural. Initially, however, the choice to deploy such tools in a desert community of men who had chosen to leave the world behind was a contentious one.

August 05 2014 | Events and Grad Group Events and News and Weekly Colloquia | No Comments »

October 29, 2014 – Erica Levin

Assistant Professor
Film and Art History, Cleveland Institute of Art

“Between Body and Environment: Carolee Schneemann’s Kinetic Theater “

Carolee Schneemann’s Kinetic Theater developed alongside happenings and Judson Dance Theater in the mid 1960s. This talk looks at how these performance works developed to engage the conditions and limits of becoming involved during the Vietnam era, as a participant in protest, but also as an embodied subject responsive to the demands media make on one’s attention and capacity to connect. 

August 04 2014 | Events and Grad Group Events and News and Weekly Colloquia | No Comments »

November 5, 2014 – Melissa Ragona

Associate Professor of Visual Culture and Critical Theory, School of Art
Carnegie Mellon University

Title TBA

August 03 2014 | Events and Grad Group Events and News and Weekly Colloquia | No Comments »

November 12, 2014 – Timothy McCall

Associate Professor of Art History
Department of History, Villanova University

“’Ussire da le cose de putti et fare le cose de homo’: Material Culture, Courtly Gifts, and Masculinity in Early Renaissance Italy.”

For a Renaissance boy to become a lord – and “leave behind childish things and do manly things” as Francesco Sforza duke of Milan instructed his son Galeazzo – required that he perform and embody values which were, at once, martial and amorous, enthralling and violent, domineering and charismatic. This demanded not only models to follow, but objects to possess, wear, and command. Attentive to the agency and even volition of material culture, we will investigate the sorts of things – brocaded garments and hunting animals in particular – that lords wielded, gave, and displayed to fashion and demonstrate ideals of courtly masculinity in fifteenth-century Italy.

August 02 2014 | Events and Grad Group Events and News and Weekly Colloquia | No Comments »

November 19, 2014 – Michelle Wang

Visiting Assistant Professor of History of Art, Bryn Mawr College

Title TBA

August 01 2014 | Events and Grad Group Events and News and Weekly Colloquia | No Comments »

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