October 26, 2022 – Paul M. Farber, PhD

Paul M. Farber, PhD
Director and Co-Founder, Monument Lab
Senior Research Scholar, Center for Public Art and Space, University of Pennsylvania

“Monument Lab: On Civic Practice and Possibility”

We encourage everyone who is on campus to join us for this in-person talk in Old Library 224. If you are not able to join us in person, please register for the Zoom link at https://visualculture.blogs.brynmawr.edu/

November 2, 2022 – Linda Kim

Linda Kim
Associate Professor of American and Modern Art, Drexel University

“Reciprocal Models: Imperial and Racial Formations at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair”

We encourage everyone who is on campus to join us for this in-person talk in Old Library 224. If you are not able to join us in person, please register for the Zoom link at https://visualculture.blogs.brynmawr.edu/

 

November 9, 2022 – Dr. Mia L. Bagneris via Zoom

Dr. Mia L. Bagneris
Associate Professor, Art History & Africana Studies
Director, Africana Studies Program
Tulane University, New Orleans, LA (Bulbancha)

Imagining the Oriental South: The Enslaved Mixed-Race Beauty in British Art and Visual Culture, c. 1865-1880
 
Using works like John Bell’s Octoroon (1868) and Robert Gavin’s Quadroon Girl (ca. 1872) as case studies, this talk explores Britons’ pronounced and continued fascination with the figure of the enslaved American mixed-race beauty—even and especially after the abolition of slavery in the United States rendered the potential of such figures as tools for abolitionist suasion obsolete.  I analyze marked visual and rhetorical echoes between representations of the so-called “tragic” mulatto, quadroon, or octoroon and concurrent expressions of Orientalism.  Ultimately, I argue that, against the upright image of Victorian England, the American South—and especially Catholic Louisiana—could be imagined as a place of luxury, debauchery, and desire, a perfect echo to the “Orient” in the British popular imagination and one made stronger by the perceived association of both regions with the traffic in pretty women as “sex slaves”.
This event will be offered via Zoom. To register, please go to https://visualculture.blogs.brynmawr.edu/

November 16, 2022 – Anthony S. Foy

Anthony S. Foy
Associate Professor of English Literature
Swarthmore College

“Racial Publicity and the Self Unseen: Black Autobiography after the Halftone”

We encourage everyone who is on campus to join us for this in-person talk in Old Library 224. If you are not able to join us in person, please register for the Zoom link at https://visualculture.blogs.brynmawr.edu/

November 30, 2022 – Sonal Khullar

Sonal Khullar
W. Norman Brown Associate Professor of South Asian Studies
Department of History of Art
University of Pennsylvania

“Decolonizing the Field: Art, Event, and Environment in India”

Referring to uses of the ‘field’ in art historical and anthropological discourses, this presentation considers a turn to site-specific, socially engaged, and collaborative artistic practices in India over the past two decades. Contemporary artists have assumed the role of fieldworkers, moving across scales and between sites over an extended period to critique modernist and capitalist systems. Through new languages of art and forms of relation, their practice challenges the organization of the art world. The affect and address of this art resonates with new modes of protest, demonstration, and gathering and with old patterns of pilgrimage, procession, and public action in South Asia. It demands reflection on methods in art history and the work of the art historian. 

We encourage everyone who is on campus to join us for this in-person talk in Old Library 224. If you are not able to join us in person, please register for the Zoom link at https://visualculture.blogs.brynmawr.edu/

September 13, 2021 – 7 PM Evening Lecture with Zakiyyah Iman Jackson

Associate Professor of English
Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences
University of Southern California

“Black Light: On the Origin and Materiality of Blackness”

Aesthesis is a political matter, such that black folk have often sought to challenge a mode of representation that mythologizes blackness as mere absence or lack. There is artmaking that seeks to transfigure both the void blackness is thought to represent and a known world whose “facts” depend on a fiction of black vacancy. These are works that, in the words of curator, Adrienne Edwards, “are philosophically charged, culturally compounded abstractions” and figurations “that point to discourse beyond medium and art movements,” alternately affirming nothing or attuning to the indeterminacy and incalculability of blackness, whether blackness be attributed to person, place, or thing. This is not to suggest that double-consciousness and its deposits can be easily uprooted, but rather that perception and its organization are meaningful and necessarily remain a ground of contestation. This talk concerns the reflective and refractive potentialities of blackness as well as its density or fullness that exceed the capture of mimetic representation. It highlights works that critically explore the received terms and limits of representation in the interest of the dissolution of given categories and conceptual forms. Focusing particular attention on Faith Ringgold’s Black Light and American People series, this talk explores blackness as varied, multi-dimensional, and a light source in its own right.

Professor Jackson is the author of Becoming Human: Matter and Meaning in an Antiblack World.

This event is co-hosted by the Bryn Mawr College Africana Studies Program and the Haverford College Visual Studies Program.

7:00 pm (via zoom).

Register here.